Sunday, May 24, 2020

Intelligence And Personality - 1682 Words

Introduction It is commonly believed that people differ in various ways, and these individual differences play a detrimental role on their behaviour at work. To be more specific, individual differences include two kernel factors which refers to intelligence and personality. It is clear that individual differences are important in determining behaviour, however, there are other external factors which are equally important, such as working environment or culture within an organisation. Intelligence Gottfredson, (1997) stated that intelligence is ‘a very general mental capability that, among other things, involves the ability to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend complex ideas, learn quickly and learn from experience.†¦show more content†¦On the contrary, those people who scored low on one kinds of ability test, were more likely to score badly on others as well. Meanwhile, Spearman also concluded that intelligence is a cognitive ability which could be measured and expressed numerically. The relationship between intelligence and work related outcomes has been found through various empirical studies. A longitudinal studies found that there is a positive moderate correlation (.51) between IQ at 12 years of age and occupational level and a slightly higher correlation (.53) between IQ at 12-year-old and income (.53) aged 40-50. (Judge, Higgins, Thoresen, Barrick, 1999) Thus, we can see that IQ level plays a significant role on work related outcomes from this empirical study. In addition, another study found that IQ level has a low correlation (.23) with performance within low complexity jobs whereas IQ has a strong correlation (.58) with performance in high complexity jobs. (Hunter Hunter, 1984; See Schmidt Hunter, 2004 for an overview) To put it another way, high intelligence is not essential for low complexity jobs, for example, waiter and cleaner does not require high IQ. On the contrary, high intelligence is crucial for complex jobs since it represents high reasoni ng and mental capabilities. Thus, it is not hard to see that individuals’ behaviour at work will be remarkably

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Frederick Douglass And The Civil War - 1712 Words

Frederick Douglass was a civil war activist, he was a father and a husband. He grew up in slavery and once he escaped he knew he still had work to do. As Frederick was growing up and as he lived , the north and south were constantly arguing and slave owners were very harsh but people still kept going, it was mostly hard on the slaves but soon the whole country was suffering from different things. In this essay (or book as I like to call it) you will learn about Frederick Douglass s life before, after, and during the Civil War. Frederick Douglass was Born sometime in 1818, and he died 77 years later. Douglass was born on a plantation in Maryland on the eastern shore in Talbot county. Although the exact date of his birth is still un-known he later in life decided it should be celebrated on February 14. Which we now celebrate as valentines day so most people do not remember it is a great mans BIRTHDAY, but some as well celebrate him on this fine day. Frederick s full name is Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, Frederick grew up living with his grandmother until he was about four or five, then one sunny day Frederick s grandmother said they were going on a trip ,Fred (Frederick) didn’t have any idea where they were going even though he kept asking his grandmother, would not answer. Soon they reached their destination Frederick still had no idea where they were then his grandmother called him over and said Frederick why don’t you go playShow MoreRelatedFrederick Douglass And The Civil War182 9 Words   |  8 Pages Frederick Douglass was many things; a man, an orator, a writer, an avid abolitionist, a presidential advisor and a slave. Douglass lived the majority of his life as a free man after escaping his bondage at age 20. However, everything he did and accomplished over the course of his life was influenced and affected by his past as a slave. Just as slavery shaped Douglass’s existence, the politics of the 19th century would not escape the pressure of the debate over slavery. From the American RevolutionRead MoreCivil War Causes: Frederick Douglass Essay2273 Words   |  10 PagesCivil War Causes: Frederick Douglass Born into slavery and fathered by an unknown white man, â€Å"Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey† was born in Maryland around 1818. He was raised by his grandparents and with an Aunt, having seen his mother only a handful of times before she died. It was during this time that he witnessed firsthand the cruelty of the institution of slavery: lashings, exposure to the elements and hunger. When he was eight years old he left for Baltimore, and it was there that hisRead MoreFrederick Douglass : The Cause Of The American Civil War998 Words   |  4 PagesIn April 1861, the Un-united States of America went to war against each other leading to the death of 600,000 Americans. This tragic period is known as the American Civil War. Although slavery was an overarching issue in American politics, the cause of the Civil War was rooted in social, political and economic disagreements. One of the contributing factors which led to the Civil War were the social disputes between the North and the South. The morality of the issue of slavery was one which wasRead MoreAnalysis Of Fredrick Douglass s If There Is No Struggle 1395 Words   |  6 PagesGrant Todd Mr. Sotak English 9 23 May, 2016 Activism within Fredrick Douglass â€Å"If there is no struggle, there is no progression,† is what Fredrick Douglass said during his speech at Canandaigua, New York During an event celebrating West Indian Emancipation Day (blackpast.org). This is saying that struggles and hardships need to happen to get anything accomplished. A lot of people today view Fredrick Douglass as a civil rights activist because the things he has achieved and the way he has positivelyRead MoreFrederick Douglass : African American Freedom Struggle888 Words   |  4 PagesFrederick Douglass became a vital figure for the African American freedom struggle during the 1860’s with the help of the abolitionist movement. Before becoming a famous spokesman Douglass was just like every other African American slave, attempting to find a way to freedom. Douglass’ runaway slave status quickly changed when abolitionist bought his freedom in hopes to strengthen the abolitionist movement. Since abolitionists were able to recognize Doug lass’ intellectual abilities it made him a keyRead MoreFrederick Douglass and the Abolition of Slavery600 Words   |  3 PagesFrederick Douglass and the Abolition of Slavery There were many influential people who fought for the abolition of slavery in the 1800s. Among these people are Harriet Tubman, William Lloyd Garrison, and our sixteenth president, Abraham Lincoln. Frederick Douglass is one of these people. As a former slave, Frederick Douglass believed he could not enjoy his freedom while the rest of his people suffered under the burden of slavery. Therefore, he spent much of his adult life working to abolishRead MoreEssay Frederick Douglass and Slavery1448 Words   |  6 PagesFrederick Douglass and Slavery Frederick Douglass the most successful abolitionist who changed America’s views of slavery through his writings and actions. Frederick Douglass had many achievements throughout his life. His Life as a slave had a great impact on his writings. His great oratory skills left the largest impact on Civil War time period literature. All in all he was the best black speaker and writer ever. Douglass was born a slave in 1817, in Maryland. He educatedRead MoreEssay on Comparison Between Frederick Douglass and Huckleberry Finn734 Words   |  3 PagesNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass AND the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Comparison Essay By: Evan Weinstock Period 7 3/11/13 During the period around The Civil War the country was in a major change and the issue slavery was at the forefront. Racial tensions were very high as most Northerners wanted the slaves to be free and all slaves wanted their freedom. During this time period of pre, during and post-Civil War many books and narratives of people’s lives and experiences where writtenRead MoreNarrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass1257 Words   |  6 PagesBook Review By Mary Elizabeth Ralls Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass: An autobiography written by Frederick Douglass Millennium publication, 1945edition 75 pages Frederick Douglass whose real name was Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey approximately birthdate is in1818, the month or day is not known, he died in 1895. He is one of the most famous advocates and the greatest leaders of anti-slavery in the past 200 or so years.Read MoreThe Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass Essay1293 Words   |  6 Pages Bishnu Mahat Term paper Frederick Douglass In the 1800 s, subjection was a significant issue in the United States. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass reveals much about American history in the midst of the period of servitude and outlines conflicts for the cancelation of subjection. As a chronicled report, it goes on data about the slave family, work, the master slave relationship, and the treatment and living states of slaves. As an abolitionist tract, it fights against recognizable

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Oedipus Essay Topics - Is it a Scam?

Oedipus Essay Topics - Is it a Scam? The cost of an essay rides on the quantity of effort the writer has to exert. Our writers always create unique content that's absolutely free from all grammatical error. Sophocles also had an exceptional view of the absolutely free will as being used to hold responsible so as to shape distinctive facets of human lives. If do not have any urge to waste time on choosing the best topic and writing the entire argumentative essay from scratch, don't forget you've a loyal group of professionals by your side. Fortunately our team consists of professional writers which possess the capability to create remarkable content for you. Additionally, a customer may ask the writer to submit part of the job for review and, if needed, ask her or him to make corrections. At ProfEssays dedicated group of writers work committed to supply the superior custom essays to all. Oedipus Essay Topics Every one of these lip balms provide protection against sunburn, windburn and chapped lips. I already understand when and where I intend to where this and I know it is going to be a conversation starter. You might need to isolate a couple of scenes for discussion. Second, talk what you shouldn't do instead of what should be carried out. Studying sociology is essential for understanding numerous difficulties and resolving them. Students often discover that almost all of their work on those essays is done before they even begin writing. An Oedipus essay doesn't need to cover the very same topics that were covered before. An argumentative essay requires you to choose a topic and have a position on it. On the other hand, the harmony isn't ruined. Power may be used for destruction, or it may be utilized to accomplish greatness. Even the gods cannot change Fate. We give a platform at which you can directly get in touch with your writer this can decrease communication barrier. Most agree that this was the ideal way for life to finish. Needless to say, we can't be like one enormous family. 9 The play starts with the fantastical look of a ghost. On account of the sort heart of this slave, the kid is permitted to survive. It's more intimidating than any carnivorous animal as now he's elusive and bodiless just enjoy a phantom. Explain the significance of the shepherd. Additionally, there are those who want to attack the issues of fate and destiny and the way this man Oedipus tried to escape them, simply to make them come true by doing this. The stages where the plays would have and will be carried out on differ significantly. Choose one particular tragedy and talk about the use of the chorus. Explain the way the play judges Oedipus. The Nuiances of Oedipus Essay Topics Dangerous actions bring terrible consequences, and refusing to reside in blindness is quite a dangerous thing, though morally it could be admirable and desired. In such a fashion, you will see the most fascinating topic efficiently. One and actions that is necessary for theoretical and practical understanding. An effort to explain irrational matters is an equation with several unknowns. Oedipus Essay Topics Secrets That No One Else Knows About In the start of the play, Laius and Jocasta need to make an important decision about whether to kill their son so as to save Laius's life. A conclusion is, undoubtedly, the most essential portion of the argumentative essay because you can either support the excellent impression or destroy it entirely. The ideal thing about us is that each time you can buy original essay papers for sale. Describe in what way the plays are very similar to and different from one another, and the way in which they do or don't support one another's purposes. What Is So Fascinating About Oedipus Essay Topics? Citations and extracts from assorted sources have to be formatted properly. Even if you're a specialist in a particular field, don't be afraid to use and cite external sources. You might want to isolate a couple of scenes for close analysis. Well, grading papers are often quite dull.

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

New Public Management Essay Example For Students

New Public Management Essay INTRODUCTIONPublic sector reforms adopted in a number of countries such as USA, UK and New Zealand in the last fifteen years and characterised by efficiency units, performance management, contracting out, market type mechanisms, and agency status have come to be known as the New Public Management or NPM. Appearance of the NPM as shifting the paradigm from the old traditional model of administration has been promoted by a remarkable degree of consensus among the political leadership of various countries and is presented today as the major tool for public sector management reforms. The elements of NPM have been implemented in diverse forms in different countries depending on their historical nature of bureaucracy and public sector management and reform objectives. For instance, more emphasis was given to performance management in Scandinavian countries, while a stronger accent was on market type mechanisms, contractualisation of the public service and systematic approaches to improving service quality in New Zealand, the UK and the USA. The long-term benefits from these reforms have not been empirically validated. Nevertheless, the major donors are agreed that what developing countries must do to improve public sector management is to sweep away the traditional public administration paradigm that underpins their bureaucracies and introduce the new public management (Turner and Hulme 1997: 230). Mongolia has not escaped from this trend. The Government of Mongolia is preparing to introduce public administration reforms based on the New Zealand experience of contract relationship between resources used and outputs purchased. However, there is a question mark about Mongolias capacity to implement such reforms and wether they meet current needs. Therefore, assuming that the concepts of NPM are quite familiar, attempts have been made to asses the Mongolian situation against prescriptions of the New Zealand model of Public Sector Reform, particularly in relation with the countrys transitional circumstances. THE NEW ZEALAND MODEL OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENTThe proponents of the New Public Management have often identified New Zealand as a good example of this contemporary mode of administrative reform called NPM. New Zealand has implemented an enormous number and range of management reforms since 1988. These include accrual basis accounting and appropriations. Budgeting for outputs rather than inputs, separation of service delivery functions from advisory and regulatory functions, replacing permanent department heads with chief executives appointed for a fixed term, discretion for managers to spend their operating budgets as they deem fit, individual employment contracts for most senior managers, annual purchase agreements between ministers and their departments, annual reports, and audited financial and performance statements (Schick 1998:2). Every element of reform has been designed to establish or strengthen contract-like relationship between the government and ministers as purchasers of goods and services, and departments and other entities as suppliers. This ?new contractualism replaced the relational contracts that characterise traditional public administration (Schick 1998:3). Managerial reform is based on a simple principle: managers cannot be held responsible for results unless they have freedom to act, that is, to spend and hire within agreed budgets as they see fit, to make their own choices concerning office accommodation and other purchases, and to run their organisation free from ex ante control by outsiders. The New Zealand experience shows how effective management practices in the private sector can be brought into a public sector environment and adapted. The change was driven by ideas that have only recently entered mainstream economics and they have been applied with full fidelity to their internal logic. Although one can justify that the country has vastly enlarged the stockpile of public management ideas and practices, however, there remain concerns related to contract-like arrangements in the public sector and there is much more to be accomplished before a final assessment can be made (Schick 1998:4). TRANSITIONAL FEATURES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION IN MONGOLIAAfter the collapse of the socialist block, radical political and economic changes occurred in most former socialist countries. According to Hesse (1993) the former socialist countries have a number of common characteristics, such as:? a transition from one party rule to a multi-party, pluralist system with democratic and accountable government;? the deconcentration and decentralisation of political power;? the creation of distinct spheres of economics and politics; and,? economic liberalisation. No socialist country has yet completed the full process of economic liberalisation. This is mainly because the task of transforming a former socialist economy is significantly more complicated than the issues facing a typical developing country. In many cases even rudimentary institutions that can be easily converted to market concepts and terminology. The process can be characterised not simply by a transition to a new economic system but also as a fundamental transformation of the whole society and all of its institutions in line with the market philosophy. Earlier literatures on civil service reforms in developing countries indicate that strategically administrative reform was successful, when it was implemented as part of the main economic and political change. There was less chance of its success, when it was undertaken on its own as a separate activity. Unfortunately those who are involved in the design of main economic and political change strategies underestimate the fact that administrative change needs to be undertaken before or together with economic and political change. It is often assumed that there is no political support and not adequate financial and technical resources to undertake public administration reforms. As a result public administration lags behind other sectors and is often criticised for being an obstacle to reforms in other sectors. This characterises the current situation in Mongolia. Despite the profound political and socio-economical changes, which have taken place in Mongolia since 1990, public administration remained the same until recently. The organisation and activities of all levels of the former public management institutions were no longer appropriate for attaining the goals of the reforms in all spheres of economic and political life. This finds its expression in the weakening of the prestige of all state institutions, their inefficient and non-operational activities, and also the ineffectiveness of Mongolian legislation and decisions of public and management institutions. Socrates oresteia EssaySUITABILITY OF THE NEW ZEALAND MODEL FOR MONGOLIAThe reasons explaining why the Government wants such a radical approach to public administration reform in the country are quite clear. The previous administrative reforms did not bring significant improvements in the public sector management and were limited by a number of structural changes in state institutions. Although there were the first attempts by the Government to separate policy coordination, regulatory and implementing functions, the question of whether the structures and functions of recently established agencies are appropriately designed to ensure efficiency and effectiveness of government operations has not been clear. At the same time, the demand for accelerating public reform with the aim to improve overall efficiency has been increased by the pressures from donor organisations. However, it should be noted that there is not sufficient justification and factual arguments developed by both the advocates and the opponents for why the country should not adopt the New Zealand model. Before making a final decision the questions such as what are the real obstacles to success of NPM in Mongolia and what are the real recipes for potential success need to be answered, in other words, there is a need to study the consequences first. It must be admitted that the task to make such a complete analysis is beyond the scope of the current work and for the time being there is very limited literature available to make a base for developing the arguments for why the country should implement NPM. Schick stresses the importance of preconditions for successfully implementing the NPM approach and claims that countries striving to uplift themselves after decades of mismanagement should not ignore these preconditions. He identifies the establishment of a formal public sector, which is based on strong civil service system and long standing habit of public managers to spend public money according to prescribed rules as one of the preconditions. In addition, he notes that if contracts and the rule of law are underdeveloped in business relations, it is highly improbable that they can be safely or effectively applied in the conduct of the governments business (Schick 1998:6). Whether Mongolia has these preconditions may be even questionable that some other developing countries, the public sector of which were operating under colonial systems and in which market mechanisms have been established for years. The transitional features of the public management of Mongolia mentioned earlier could serve as an explanation for why such emphasis should be made. If the New Zealend model is all about applying the best techniques of private sector management in public management, the question of whether just newly emerging private sector of Mongolia has accumulated those techniques and practices is even more doubtful. NPM is often attempted assuming that proper capacity exists, which is not always the case. The actual capacity of Mongolia to apply NPM should be thoroughly investigated, especially when it comes to managers ability decide and to have responsibility. Otherwise the reform may have a impact on the public confidence in the government operations. In Addition, as Hughes (1994: 83) claims, implementation is a real problem if there is insufficient attention paid to it. Implementation is much more costly in developing countries where a traditional model bureaucracy is not well developed and some basic preconditions are not ensured. In Mongolia, informal estimates have been made that USD 20 million are required to implement NPM reforms. This accounts only for the transitional periods from the old to the new system. Some potential donors like the Asian Development Bank and the World Bank are committed to provide technical assistance and program loans in support of the reforms. So far neither the national government nor the donor agencies have made an estimation of how much the country would benefit from the reforms. It is not meaningful to think that if USD 20 million were available to the country today, this would have an automatic impact on the structure, efficiency and vision of the public administration and sustainability of reforms. NPM requires good planning and a very good estimate of the real capacities to implement it and a good program of assistance or training to build these capacities. To some extent, the donors commitments are influenced by their willingness to show at least ane developing or transitional country, where the NPM model will successfully work and it has been encouraged by the interest of the current Government of Mongolia in the model. The major donors are often quick to sell a model that is pre-packaged without carefully looking at the implementation side of it. Public management reform is a difficult process to define and implement in general. In the developing countries problems of inefficiency, culture impact, political pressure and other factors such as corruption and a lack of competitiveness and sophisticated markets render this task even more difficult. Reform programs should have a long-term perspective and be free from political ambitions that could negatively affect their long-term effects and objectives. As there has always been a tendency for the public sector reforms to be donor driven, it is much more desirable to develop a Mongolian version of reform that satisfies the needs of the country and its administrative environment and reality, which may or may not be NPM. The conclusion to be made here is that sooner or later the country should move towards some forms of NPM. However, rather than taking such an extreme and prompt action to immediately adopt the most advanced model of it, the focus should be on capacity building to ensure necessary pre-conditions have been established for its future successful implementation. Political Issues

Friday, April 3, 2020

John Calvin

Early reformers dwelt on correcting mistakes in the Roman Catholic Church’s doctrines. This was a dangerous undertaking because it led to persecutions sometimes. The Roman Catholic Church had already split before John Calvin defected from it. He was, therefore, a second generation reformer. There is a controversy surrounding John Calvin’s birth.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on John Calvin specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More According to Skoczylas (2001), Calvin was born in 1506. However other sources such as the Christian Classic Ethereal Library (CCEL) (n.d.) claim that he was born on 10th July 1509 in Noyon, France. In his early years, Calvin was educated by the Roman Catholic Church (CCEL, n.d.). However, in 1533, Calvin disengaged from the Roman Catholic Church after establishing contacts with people opposed to its teaching (Roxborogh, 2001). Reformers before him gave little thought to spreading th e word of God beyond the Christians strongholds. Calvin’s calling, therefore, embarked on correcting this mistake. His training on legal issues and his organization skills enabled him command a large and loyal following (Skoczylas, 2001). For that reason, Calvin’s teachings and writings form the foundation of many theological studies. This essay is, hence, a summary of the life of John Calvin and his impact on Christianity. Calvin spent his early life in a family of staunch Catholics. His father, actually, wanted him to join priesthood (CCEL, n.d.). CCEL (n.d.) adds that, as a fourteen year old, Calvin went to school at the college de Marche in Paris. This college was meant to prepare him for university studies. Before the end of 1523, he was forced to transfer his studies to College Montaigu (CCEL, n.d.). During his stay here, Calving started using the name Ioannis Calvinus. Ioannis Calvinus was the Latin form of the name John Calvin (CCEL, n.d.). As a student, most o f his personal effects were paid for by the Roman Catholic Church. For instance, his education was catered for in part by a few small parishes (CCEL, n.d.). He later relocated to Orleans to join a law school. Calvin completed his studies on civic law in 1532(CCEL, n.d.). In 1553, he disengaged from the Roman Catholic Church and began studying on his own before embarking on a number of Christian writings (Roxborogh, 2001). Finally, Calvin continued with his writing, preaching and lecturing until he met his death on 27th May 1564 (CCEL, n.d.). Haykin (2001) states that earlier reformers gave little thought to missions. It is obvious that they had no concern for oversees missions. These reformers were, therefore, not keen on capturing the minds of non-Christians. John Calvin defected from the Roman Catholic Church and started doing what most of the earlier reformers had not done. Through his writings, he advocated on advancing Christ’s kingdom to non-Christians (Haykin, 2001).Ad vertising Looking for essay on religion theology? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Although he toured other towns to spread the gospel, Calvin spent most of his life in Geneva (CCEL, n.d.).The bible says that the word of God should be preached in all towns, starting from Jerusalem. Calvin, perhaps, thought that Jerusalem had experienced enough and it was now time to establish missions elsewhere. According to Calvin, the advancement of the church depended on God’s mercy (Haykin, 2001). It is from this mercy that God created man as the noblest creature on earth. Therefore, man is endowed with intelligence and free will (Skoczylas, 2001). These kinds of teachings by Calving were meant to liberalize the Roman Catholics and free the minds of Protestants. For that reason, Calving was also credited with the establishment of a more democratic world. Alongside Lutherans and Anglicans teachings, Calvin’s ideas and examples were regarded highly by the Protestants (Roxborogh, 2001). It is, therefore, difficult for a protestant church to understand itself without reference to Calvin’s work. However, not all people welcomed his teachings. According to Wellman (n.d), Calvin is the most loathed theologian of the last 2000 years. His haters include many in the church and secular spheres. Calvin’s conversion from Roman Catholicism was sudden. In 1533, he developed friendship with Pierre Robert and Melchior Wolmar who were Protestant Reformers (Wellman, n.d). His new friends used lectures and writings to criticize the Roman Catholic Church. These teachings radicalized Calvin from a staunch Catholic to a vocal Protestant. Calvin was later accused of unorthodox behavior after helping Wolmar draft a speech that advanced protestant views. This forced him to leave Paris in 1533 to avoid persecution (Roxborogh, 2001). It can be concluded that early reformers gave little thought to missions beyond Chri stian strongholds. Calvin’s greatest impact on Christianity was, therefore, the establishments of missions in areas occupied by non-Christians. Calving endeavored to spread the word of God to the last part of the world. Additionally, he can also be credited with liberalizing the Christian mind. To date, Calvin’s teachings act as the base for the reformed and Presbyterian theological practices (Roxborogh, 2001). Many believe that Calvin taught most of the significant things about God (Roxborogh, 2001). Finally, it is practically impossible for a Protestant church to understand itself without reference to John Calvin’s work. References Christian Classic Ethereal Library. Biography of John Calvin: John Calvin-French reformer and theologian.  Web.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on John Calvin specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More Haykin, M. A. G. (2001). Reformation and revival: John calving missiona ry influence in France. A Quarterly Journal for Church Leadership10 (4), 1-7. Web. Roxborogh, J. (2001). John Calvin (1509-1564). Web. Skoczylas, A. (2001). Mr. Simson’s knotty case: divinity, politics, and due process in early eighteenth-century Scotland. McGill-Queen’s Press. Web. Wellman, S. Essential facts about John Calvin, as well as a very extensive reading list!  Web. This essay on John Calvin was written and submitted by user Violet D. to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly. You can donate your paper here.

Sunday, March 8, 2020

Free Essays on The Puritans

PURITANS The Puritans were a group of people who grew discontent in the Church of England and worked towards religious, moral and societal reforms. The writings and ideas of John Calvin, a leader in the Reformation, gave rise to Protestantism and were pivotal to the Christian revolt. They contended that The Church of England had become a product of political struggles and man-made doctrines. The Puritans were one branch of dissenters who decided that the Church of England was beyond reform. Escaping persecution from church leadership and the King, they came to America. The Puritans believed that the Bible was God's true law, and that it provided a plan for living. The established church of the day described access to God as monastic and possible only within the confines of "church authority". Puritans stripped away the traditional trappings and formalities of Christianity which had been slowly building throughout the previous 1500 years. Theirs was an attempt to "purify" the church and their own lives. What many of us remember about the Puritans is reflective of the modern definition of the term and not of the historical account. Point one, they were not a small group of people. In England many of their persuasion sat in Parliament. So great was the struggle that England's Civil War pitted the Puritans against the Crown Forces. Though the Puritans won the fight with Oliver Cromwell's leadership, their victory was short-lived; hence their displacement to America. Point two, the witchcraft trials did not appropriately define their methods of living for the 100+ years that they formed successful communities. What it did show was the danger that their self-imposed isolation had put them in. Most of the Puritans settled in the New England area. As they immigrated and formed individual colonies, their numbers rose from 17,800 in 1640 to 106,000 in 1700. Religious exclusiveness was the foremost principle of their society. The s... Free Essays on The Puritans Free Essays on The Puritans PURITANS The Puritans were a group of people who grew discontent in the Church of England and worked towards religious, moral and societal reforms. The writings and ideas of John Calvin, a leader in the Reformation, gave rise to Protestantism and were pivotal to the Christian revolt. They contended that The Church of England had become a product of political struggles and man-made doctrines. The Puritans were one branch of dissenters who decided that the Church of England was beyond reform. Escaping persecution from church leadership and the King, they came to America. The Puritans believed that the Bible was God's true law, and that it provided a plan for living. The established church of the day described access to God as monastic and possible only within the confines of "church authority". Puritans stripped away the traditional trappings and formalities of Christianity which had been slowly building throughout the previous 1500 years. Theirs was an attempt to "purify" the church and their own lives. What many of us remember about the Puritans is reflective of the modern definition of the term and not of the historical account. Point one, they were not a small group of people. In England many of their persuasion sat in Parliament. So great was the struggle that England's Civil War pitted the Puritans against the Crown Forces. Though the Puritans won the fight with Oliver Cromwell's leadership, their victory was short-lived; hence their displacement to America. Point two, the witchcraft trials did not appropriately define their methods of living for the 100+ years that they formed successful communities. What it did show was the danger that their self-imposed isolation had put them in. Most of the Puritans settled in the New England area. As they immigrated and formed individual colonies, their numbers rose from 17,800 in 1640 to 106,000 in 1700. Religious exclusiveness was the foremost principle of their society. The s...

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Influencing Buyers Behavior Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

Influencing Buyers Behavior - Essay Example Just like in many other countries, businesses prefer their adverts run during the prime hours such as before the news, during and after news because it reaches out to a significant percentage of the targeted audience. Experts suggest that is crucial for companies to consider consumer preferences before embarking on the production process (Marr, 2013). This is the reason why Coca-Cola, a leading multinational beverage company, produces beverages targeting consumers in specific parts of the world depending on their preferences. As a matter of fact, many business analysts suggest that accurate identification of the consumer preferences is among the major factors that have given Coca-Cola a competitive edge in the beverage industry. Liu, Denizci Guillet, Xiao and Law (2014), suggest that consumer preferences are influenced by numerous factors numerous factors such as the geographical location, climate, culture and religion. For example, some religion denominations such as the Seventh Day Adventist discourage consumption of beverages that have caffeine such as Coke, one of the leading brands of Coca-Cola (Marr, 2013). Customer preferences based on the geographical location and culture of the people explains why Coke is popular in the USA where most people take caffeine, while Fresca, a caffeine-free soft drink is popular in most of the African and south American countries where a significant percentage of the population avoid caffeine. Jones, R. B., Soler-Lopez, M., Zahra, D., Shankleman, J., & Trenchard-Mabere, E. (2013). Using online adverts to increase the uptake of cervical screening amongst â€Å"real Eastenders†: an opportunistic controlled trial. BMC research notes, 6(1),